333 Area Code

    area code

  • A three-digit number that identifies one of the telephone service regions into which the US, Canada, and certain other countries are divided and that is dialed when calling from one area to another
  • A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunications to allocate telephone numbers to subscribers and to route telephone calls in a telephone network. A closed numbering plan, such as found in North America, imposes a fixed total length to numbers.
  • The Chinese Telephone Code Plan is the way to group telephone numbers in the mainland of the People’s Republic of China. Land lines and mobile phones follow different systems: land lines use area codes, while mobile phones do not.
  • a number usually of 3 digits assigned to a telephone area as in the United States and Canada

    333

  • 333 is an album and video album released by Green Jelly in 1994.
  • * Flavius Dalmatius and Domitius Zenofilus are appointed consuls.
  • 300 (three hundred) is the natural number following 299 and preceding 301.

333 area code

333 area code – ONLY HALF

ONLY HALF EVIL – 333 SAYINGS
ONLY HALF EVIL - 333 SAYINGS
333 sayings!

Here are some examples:

• The USA is bankrupt and nobody in the whole world wants to know this

• Being online is like being controlled

• We’ve had enough of words! – Put dishonest politicians under the guillotine!

• Porn is for wankers like politics is for liars

• Armageddon – coming soon!

This e-book is an update of >>THE AGE OF PISCES ENDS<<

333 sayings!

Here are some examples:

• The USA is bankrupt and nobody in the whole world wants to know this

• Being online is like being controlled

• We’ve had enough of words! – Put dishonest politicians under the guillotine!

• Porn is for wankers like politics is for liars

• Armageddon – coming soon!

This e-book is an update of >>THE AGE OF PISCES ENDS<<

The Vanderzee-Harper House

The Vanderzee-Harper House
New Brighton, Staten Island, New York City, New York, United States

Summary

The Vanderzee-Harper House is a fine surviving example of a Queen Anne style residence with Shingle style details, built c.1887 in Staten Island’s affluent “Fort Hill” section. The house features many details characteristic of the Queen Anne and Shingle styles, including a prominent three-story tower; bay window projections; bracketed, cantilevered gable projections; turned woodwork and a curved roofline at the porch; textured shingle and clapboard siding; a variety of window types and shapes, including multi-light upper sash and stained-glass windows; and a tall, decorative masonry chimney.

The house was constructed c.1887 for Margaret A. Shields (later Vanderzee) who had recently purchased the property from Charles A. Herpich. A Manhattan furrier and prominent Staten Island resident, Herpich had substantial real estate holdings in the area, including his large home nearby at the corner of Westervelt and Hendricks avenues.

Having purchased the property in 1887, Margaret A. Vanderzee retained ownership until 1920, although she and her husband had relocated to Philadelphia by 1895. After occupancy by several renters, the home was owned for over twenty-five years by the family of Thomas Harper, a grocery store owner who was active in local civic affairs. The house has recently been restored and many of its historic decorative features remain intact.

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

The Site

The Vanderzee-Harper House is located on Fort Hill in northeastern Staten Island at the edges of the villages of Tompkinsville, New Brighton and St. George. Considered the oldest European village in eastern Staten Island, Tompkinsville was known in colonial times as the Watering Place for a fresh water spring located there. According to Holden’s Staten Island, The History of Richmond County, Giovanni da Verrazzano, who is credited with “discovering” the island in 1524, was led “to safe anchorage near ‘The Watering Place’” by resident “friendly LeniLenapes.” Evidence of earlier inhabitation by Native Americans during the Woodland period has also been found in the surrounding area, including traces of campsites, Native American artifacts and “triangular points.” In 1639, several families sent by Captain David Pietersz De Vries, who was the second patroon to receive a land grant on Staten Island from the Dutch West India Company, settled near the Watering Place. According to research done by former Staten Island Borough Historian Dick Dickenson, there is evidence that these colonists may have owned African slaves, the first living on Staten Island. The colony did not survive past 1641.

Residential development of this section of Staten Island was first promoted by Daniel D. Tompkins. A governor of New York and later vice president of the United States, Tompkins (1774-1825) spent considerable time on Staten Island during the War of 1812. Impressed by the island’s natural beauty and the ease of travel to Manhattan, in October 1816, Tompkins commissioned a survey of a portion of his recently purchased land to be developed as the village of Tompkinsville. Realizing that transportation would significantly aid development, he procured the incorporation of the Richmond Turnpike Company to establish a highway from the New Blazing Star Ferry on the west shore of Staten Island to Tompkinsville along the route of present-day Victory Boulevard. He also acquired an interest in the steamboat monopoly of Fulton and Livingston and the following year established regular ferry service between Staten Island and Whitehall Street in New York City. In 1817, Tompkins, in his last year as governor of New York, signed the “Final Abolition Act” that freed all slaves living in the state by 1827. (Although a known abolitionist, the 1800 U. S. Census lists Daniel D. Tompkins living in the 1st Ward in New York City as having one enslaved person in his household.) Tompkins borrowed heavily to finance his enterprises in Staten Island, expecting to be reimbursed for expenses he had incurred on behalf of the government during the War of 1812. Stalled repayments brought about foreclosure proceedings on the land, and following his death in 1825 other creditors brought suit against his estate. Several of his children and his nephew, Caleb T. Ward, some of whom were in part responsible for the early development of the adjacent village of Stapleton, purchased portions of his former holdings at auction in the late 1820s and early 1830s.

In 1830, Dr. John S. Westervelt (1799-1869), the first health officer of the port of New York, who had married Daniel Tompkins’ daughter Hannah, purchased a ninety-eight acre tract that formerly had been part of her father’s estate. The Westervelts moved into Tompkins’ house (demolished) on Fort Hill near the present-day intersection of Fort Place and Sherman Avenue. To provide access to this property from Richmond Terrace and the dock at the foot of

Need to call the cab?

Need to call the cab?
Easy to remember 333-3333, but don’t forget the area code 415

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.